Breaking Free from the Bondage of Betrayal

Since January 2014 I have been doing a study on Breaking Free by Beth Moore.  Yes a year is a long time to spend on one book, but I’m not just reading, I’m memorizing the scriptures, answering the questions, doing chapter outlines, and trying to apply all that I am learning.  I cannot move on to the next chapter until I feel like I have fully grasped and applied the message.

I haven’t written much about my study because, honestly, I needed to do this for me and I was afraid that since the book was older it would be old news to you all by now.  However, there have been times where I just have to share.  Today is one of those times.

Have you ever been betrayed?

Stupid question, I know.  It is not much of a stretch to say that we have all been betrayed at one time or another,  Betrayal hurts; I mean really hurts.  While our TV and books are filled with heartbreak and betrayal, the Bible is too.

The man with a heart for God, David, was both betrayed and a betrayer.  In Psalm 55 we find David in great distress , feeling surrounded by enemies:

Psalm 55:12-14 (NKJ): For it is not an enemy who reproaches me;  Then I could bear it.  Nor is it one who hates me who has exalted himself against me; Then I could hide from him.   But it was you, a man my equal, My companion and my acquaintance.  14 We took sweet counsel together, And walked to the house of God in the throng.

” Only a person with intimate access to your heart can betray you to the point David describes here.” (p. 127)

In my opinion, this is the reason betrayal hurts so much: It is done by a friend, husband, wife, boyfriend, girlfriend, or relative-someone who you love and believe loves you back.

Been there, done that, too many times.  My biggest hurts, betrayals have come from within my own church.  I had a hard time understanding how this could happen in church.  In a conversation with my pastor it was said, “If they could do it with Jesus, why don’t you think they could do it to you?

It is true; there is no greater betrayal in history than the betrayal of Jesus Christ by Judas Iscariot.

“During the supper (Matt 26) Jesus said of Judas, ” I tell you the truth, one of you will betray me” (v. 21).  Later Jesus said to the other disciples, “This very night you will all fall away on the account of me” (v. 31).  Christ said that one would betray and all would fall away.  Why do you think Christ considered only Judas a betrayer even though the other disciples deserted him and fled?

I don’t know the correct answer, but clearly Judas’s actions were planned and deliberate while the remaining disciples reacted in fear.  Judas showed premeditation.  I usually think of betrayal as something the betrayer knew would devastate but did not care enough to act differently” ( p. 128).

Think about it.  Does the betrayal hurt more because the betrayer knew his or her actions would hurt you?  It wasn’t accidental; it was intentional.

” A second reason Christ may have considered only Judas’s actions betrayal appears in Matthew 9:4-Knowing their thoughts, Jesus said, ‘Why do entertain evil thoughts in your heart?’  Christ could see evil in Judas’s heart.  I don’t believe he saw evil in the disciples’ hearts. Rather I think he saw fear.  Big difference.”

Jesus knows our hearts.  Jesus knew the hearts of his disciples.

Most of our experiences in betrayals will be as a result of selfishness.  Yes, Judas’s betrayal was out of both selfishness and evil, but we can still learn how to react to betrayals by looking to Jesus.

In Matthew 26:53, Jesus says, “Do you think I cannot call on my Father, and he will at once put at my disposal 12 legions of angels.”  Christ had the power to take out Judas and destroy all of His enemies.  But he didn’t.  Why?  Because he trusted in His Father.  He trusted His Father would use the whole mess to carry out His Father’s purpose.

We too must look to what God can do with the hurts of our betrayals.  God did not make Judas a liar, thief, or a betrayer, but He did use him to complete some important work.

If  asked if I could change my ultimate betrayal, my initial reaction would be “Yes, Yes, Yes”.  Honestly, I never want to go through something like that again.  However, that betrayal is what led me to a full surrender in Christ.  It led me to realize just how dependent on Christ I really am.  It helped me to become the person God made me to be and I wouldn’t change that for anything in this world.  So, while my gut response would be “Yes,” my ultimate answer would be a “No, thank you.”

I’m not trying to downplay your hurt.  I’m just trying to show you that God can indeed work that hurt for your good or for His purposes.  I don’t like what I went through, but I sure love the person I am now.

Where are you on your road to recovery?

Are you still holding on to the hurt?  Can’t seem to move past it?  Let me ask you this: If God can use Judas’s betrayal for good, don’t you think he can use your hurt for good?

Are you willing to let him?

Until tomorrow,

Missy

 

 

 

 

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